Alphonso mango season ends early due to environmental changes

As the fervor of the third phase of Lok Sabha elections wanes across Maharashtra’s 11 constituencies, another event approaches its conclusion – the Alphonso mango season.

Renowned for its exquisite taste and hefty price tag, this year’s harvest bids farewell earlier than anticipated, leaving only a brief window for enthusiasts to indulge in its succulent delights.
Jayantbhai Desai, a prominent mango cultivator in Ratnagiri, reflects on the unusual timing of this year’s season, which commenced as early as February and is slated to conclude by May 15th. Typically, the season spans from March to June, but environmental shifts have led to this unprecedented timeline.
Despite the early start, prices have remained steep, with a box of Alphonso mangoes fetching Rs 25,000 in February and currently priced at Rs 2,000 per box. This initial premium is a long-standing tradition, with the first box of the season commanding high bids at markets in Mumbai and Pune.
For Jayant Desai, mango cultivation is a legacy passed down through generations, a testament to perseverance and innovation. Overcoming adversities like rocky terrains, his family has carved lush orchards amidst the harsh landscape, embodying the spirit of resilience.
In the realm of exports, Amar Desai who is the Chief Executive Officer of Desai Products, Manufacturer and exporter of Alphonso Mango products, said that we stands as pioneers, having introduced Alphonso mangoes to international markets in 10 countries, including America and Japan. Today, our company endeavours span beyond fruit exports, encompassing mango by-products such as pulp and canned varieties, catering to a global demand.
Despite India’s dominance in Alphonso mango exports, challenges persist, including limited geographical availability and a short harvesting window. As the season draws to a close, aficionados bid adieu to this ephemeral delicacy, eagerly awaiting its return next year.
Anand Desai, a farmer of Alphonso mangoes, laments the challenges posed by pests such as Thrips and mango hoppers, which threaten to decimate yields despite diligent efforts and substantial investments in pesticides and fertilisers. Anand said that we only urge the government that we need to protect our mango from Thrips, but there is no cure in India for thrips. We call upon the government to develop a solution for combating thrips infestations.-ANI

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